Days 2 and 3 Campervan Conversion Leave: A bit of everything to procrastinate painting, and a successful curtain header!

I have suffered a grievous spray-adhesive injury.  After spraying ’til I could spray no more with my right hand on the morning of day 2, I sprayed ’til I could spray no more with my left hand in the afternoon, and woke up on day 3 with muscle strains in my hands and forearms.  I can’t even squeeze the toothpaste out of the tube.  They really should put a safety warning on the can.  I am happy to report, however, that I ensured that both Clifford and I were not adversely affected by fumes (he spent the day running around the yard carrying soft toys, and lying on his sunbed outside; he wasn’t allowed in the garage), and I didn’t stick anything to anything to which it should not be stuck. *beam*

I got the second ceiling panel covered on day two, and the third on day 3 (this time holding the nozzle down with my thumb) except for sticking the flaps down on the back.  I keep forgetting to take photos of the spray adhesive process, because I worry that the glue will dry too much before I have a chance to get the fabric stretched over the panel.  You will have to make do with pictures of the gluing of the flaps of panel 2, and the covered front of panel 3.

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Panels 1 & 2

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Panel 3

I also got the 3mm closed cell EVA foam insulation stuck onto the back of my first ceiling panel with the Kwik Grip adhesive.  The tin said that before using the adhesive on any polymers, you should check compatibility.  Of course I forgot to do that, didn’t I.  A very exciting unknown exothermic reaction took place between the adhesive and the EVA, starting with bubbles of an unknown gas, warping of the foam so it no longer lay flat, and finally generating so much heat that I felt it through the back of the foam.  (Any polymer chemists out there?  The adhesive is a polychloroprene, but the solvents are not specified.)  However, once I had pressed the foam flat against the panel, it stuck well, and the reaction seems to have been limited to a very shallow depth of the foam, as the EVA is undamaged when viewed from the other side.  Jolly exciting!  (but I might avoid using that adhesive on the foam next time and use a hot melt glue gun instead).  Forgot to take photos of this in the heat* of all the chemistry excitement.  Maybe I SHOULD do it again, and film it.  However, since I have no exciting pictures of bubbling exothermic reactions, here’s a picture of something I managed not to do:

*Do you see what I did there? 😀

University students + superglue = FUN! Click to visit source website.

Next I prepared to vacuum Kevan out for the final bit of sanding and priming.  I got sidetracked removing the rubber door seals and the pinchweld window edgings, and labelling them so I knew which way to put them back on.  Of course the window seals were stuck on with a sticky black goo, which I will have to clean off with solvent before I paint, ho hum.  Why do they do that?  The pinchweld works well enough to hold it in place…

Labelling as I go

Labelling as I go

sliding door seal with blue masking tape labels at the corners, and old tailgate seal (top right)

sliding door seal with blue masking tape labels at the corners, and old tailgate seal (top right)

Removing the driver's side window seal

Removing the driver’s side window seal

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The black goo

You may be wondering what the hell was hanging on our washing line in the above photos.  That was my girlfriend’s doing.  They are the skins of de-stuffed stuffed animals. I also found this Barbie holocaust in the laundry tub yesterday.  This is what you get living with ‘creative’ people. 🙂

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I vacuumed Kevan, then I retired inside and continued with the curtain making.  This was my second attempt at a curtain prototype.  I had originally decided to go with a ‘rod-pocket’ style curtain header, where the curtain wire would slide into a pocket sewn into the fabric.  However when I tried this, the fabric wouldn’t bunch up enough to be able to open the curtain.  So this time my prototype is a ‘hidden-tab’ style curtain header.  I used sections of 15mm wide grosgrain ribbon for the tabs.  I sealed the cut ends of the ribbon with clear nail polish to stop them fraying, did some maths to work out how many tabs I wanted and how far apart, pinned them on at the top pointing upwards, sewed them on, then folded them down and pinned them with the end tucked underneath to create the loop that goes around the curtain wire, and then sewed the bottom.  Hopefully the pictures explain it…

tabs sewn on at the top

tabs pinned on at the top

Sewn on at the top

Sewn on at the top

Tabs folded under and pinned

Tabs folded under and pinned

Bottom of tab sewn

Bottom of tab sewn

Close up

Close up

OMG, look at our rug.  That’s disgusting.  On second thought, don’t look at our rug.  Instead, look at the pictures of the test hanging of the curtain below:

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Not the work of a professional, but I think it will do.  Hurrah!  So that was just the top of the curtain.  I also have to line it with blockout fabric, and make a similar hidden tab setup at the bottom once I have worked out how long to make it (after I have installed the curtain wire in Kevan).

What else did I do.. oh yeah, I sanded two of the three ceiling support beams.  They were a bit scuffed and scratched, and an ugly grey.  I’ll paint them white.

This is one of them

This is one of them

Mostly just scuff marks which came off with a light sand

Mostly just scuff marks which came off with a light sand

That’s about it for days 2 & 3.  I procrastinated a fair bit.  I also slept in til 10 both days, which is not quite the ‘work-from-dawn-’til-dusk’ that I had in mind… I am adamant that I will finish the paint preparation on day 4!  Wish me luck.  It is day 4 already, and I’m still reminiscing and blogging about days 2 & 3.

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